The Parable of the Faithful Husband

temple-symbols

Three men were young, naive, and smitten with love. They each believed that their bride was perfect in every way. As they committed their lives to their brides, they thought to themselves (and said to others), “I make this commitment — enter this covenant — because my bride is flawless. It is for this reason that I love her, and commit to her.”

Others looked on who were older and more mature, who had been married for quite some time. These shook their heads knowingly, and with apprehension for what these men would face in the coming years ahead. Some tried to counsel the young men, assuring them that their brides were wonderful, and that nobody — not even they — were perfect. The young men repelled such talk.

But as always, the closer one gets in a marriage, the more warts one sees. These young men soon began to notice the flaws in their brides — the toilet seat covers, the laundry on the floor, the bad cooking, the cattiness towards neighbors, the snoring, etc. To these flaws, each man responded differently. Continue reading

Bigots and Fanatics

In the most recent conference, Elder Oaks said:

“today, when [followers of Christ] hold out for right and wrong as they understand it, they are sometimes called bigots and fanatics.”

I expect that from the world.  What most depresses me is that too many of those calling Mormons bigots and fanatics are, well, other Mormons.

[I also find it interesting how Oaks and Packer have switched places recently among the more progressive set of Mormons].

The Debate Isn’t Over

Today, the United States Supreme Court declined to hear several appeals regarding same-sex marriage, allowing the decisions of lower courts (who overturned same-sex marriage bans) to become the de facto law of the land in several U.S. states. This is troubling to many of us — but we want to reassure our readers that the fight is far, far from over.

Not only did the Supreme Court decline to rule on the matter, but the debate is alive and well in many U.S. states and in many countries. Further, if the Sixth Circuit upholds traditional marriage, the Supreme Court will likely revisit these cases. Nothing is locked in stone (or will ever be).

Further, did the fight over abortion (and its societal consequences) end, simply because the Supreme Court declared it legal? Not at all — rather, the fight against abortion has picked up steam in recent decades, and public opinion has shifted towards the pro-life movement.

Do not stop standing up for your beliefs about marriage, civilly and respectfully. Continue reading