Days of Awe

Gale Boyd is a convert to the LDS Church. In 1983, she and her husband decided to move their family to Israel and explore their Jewish heritage.

She was unprepared for the culture shock she experienced as an American Jewish Mormon living in Jewish Zion. Not only was there the language barrier but also the differences in money, weights and measures, Sabbath observance, and even the year was counted differently.

As she became immersed in Israeli culture, she learned about Jewish Holy Days and their symbolism.

Her experiences led her to write Days of Awe with the purpose of sharing with Latter-day Saints the Christian symbolism found in the celebration of Jewish Holy Days.

The book contains a history of Old Testament feasts, their ancient and current patterns of observance, their prophetic symbolism, and their relevance to each of us as Latter-day Saints today.

She also clears up some misconceptions about the Jewish people, their scripture, the complexity of their religion, and their history.

Join Laura Harris Hales of LDS Perspectives Podcast and Gale Boyd as they discuss Judaism, Holy Days, and the religious past, present, and future.

To access your free copy of Days of Awe, check out the links to resources at LDS Perspectives Podcast.

7 thoughts on “Days of Awe

  1. Leo, just remove the junk at the end, everything after the last slash.
    http://www.ldsperspectives.com/2017/04/05/jewish-holy-days/

    Her other works are pretty good too. She brings up things that have to be added to the “vast frontier library” (Jeff Lindsay’s term) that was available to JS, and/or his co-conspirators, if the BoM had been a modern creation.

    There are just too many alleged sources, put forth by critics, for BoM content and the surrounding story. To find, read, absorb, and synthesize all those purported sources would take a genius or at least a dedicated scholar. JS was a farm boy. For the BoM to be a modern creation, someone other than JS would need to have been the principle author, and that means that his scribes, Emma, Martin and Oliver, would have been in on the conspiracy. Those three, plus David Whitmer, could not have been “dupes”.

  2. I was semi-horrified that Gale was required to get rid of footnotes in support of making the book fit for a general audience.

    So general audiences aren’t to know that it’s advisable to be able to ensure you’re grounded in fact?

    I appreciated the insight into Jewish Holy Days and culture.

    Mormon emphasis on the new law represented by Christ is based on the Book of Mormon reality, where a rigid interpretation of the Law of Moses was used by numerous individuals to reject the possibility of a Christ. As Abinadi would tell the priests of Noah, such a position demonstrated that they actually didn’t know their scriptures, as all things testify of the Christ that would come.

  3. Great episode. There’s a similar 50-minute series done by one Dan Gallagher that overviews the main feasts and how they symbolize Christ’s work and God’s timetable. I highly recommend it:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pLH3kAghP5A

    Gale mentioned a little-known Israelite feast called “bakrim”? I couldn’t tell what she was saying. Did she mean the feast of firstfruits?

    Yes Meg, it blows my mind that footnotes apparently turn off potential readers. I can only assume that publishers know the market very well, so it can only make me shake my head sadly.

  4. Great episode. There’s a similar 50-minute series done by one Dan Gallagher that overviews the main feasts and how they symbolize Christ’s work and God’s timetable. I highly recommend it:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pLH3kAghP5A

    Gale mentioned a little-known Israelite feast called “bakrim”? I couldn’t tell what she was saying. Did she mean the feast of firstfruits?

    Yes Meg, it blows my mind that footnotes apparently turn off potential readers. I can only assume that publishers know the market very well, so it only makes me shake my head sadly.

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