Mental Health Myths

Religious LDS culture has historically struggled to find a place for matters of mental health and depression as it dovetails with our mortal experience and our theology.

As a result, many members may be unsure of how we as a people stand with respect to issues of depression, anxiety, and other common mental health issues.

Elder Alexander B. Morrison writes: “I assure you that Latter-day Saints are in no way exempt from the burden of mental illness, either as victim, caregiver, family member, or friend. In every ward and stake, there are severely depressed men and women; elderly people with failing memories and reduced intellectual capacities; youth or adults struggling to escape the dark specter of suicide; persons of all ages, both sexes, and every walk of life, who exhibit aberrant, even bizarre behavior.”

Using Elder Morrison’s book “Valley of Sorrows” as a backdrop resource, Brian Murdock, a licensed marriage and family therapist, and LDS Perspectives host Nick Galieti begin their discussion by debunking common myths about mental health issues.

Murdock then addresses the topic of clinical depression: what depression is, and what it isn’t. He offers some insights to consider for people who are currently suffering from depression, as well as to those who are interacting with those experiencing clinical depression. This episode also offers some practical advice for bishops, or other members of the church who want to help those with depression.

This episode is a great introduction and survey of the subject of one of the most common mental health issues we find in our society.

Access mental health resources mentioned in this episode at LDS Perspectives Podcast.

Book Review: “Let Your Hearts and Minds Expand” by Thomas F. Rogers

imagesReview of Let Your Hearts and Minds Expand by Thomas F. Rogers.

Part of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship’s “Living Faith” series.

In his Foreword to this Book, Terryl L. Givens states he wants to “get out of the way and let you the reader get on with” reading the book rather than waste time with an introduction.  I feel much the same way:  Just read this book, and forget about this book review.

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Recommended Reading for CES Instructors, in light of Elder Ballard’s recent remarks

If you follow any Mormon topics on any form of social media, it’s likely you’ve heard about Elder Ballard’s recent remarks:

“Gone are the days when a student asked an honest question and the teacher responded, ‘Don’t worry about it.’ Gone are the days when a student raised a sincere concern and a teacher bore his or her testimony as a response intended to avoid the issue.”

What I hope to do in this post is list a few resources that a seminary/institute (or even a really dedicated Sunday School teacher) could read to help them get the knowledge to either give good answers to these questions or to know where to look and find the answers. Continue reading

Holding onto Hope: The Rest of the Story

Note: Emma’s story was recently featured in the March edition of The Friend, a children’s magazine published by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The title of the article is “Holding onto Hope.” This blog post tells the rest of Emma’s story.

Emma on the couchIn early spring of 2014, my seven-year old daughter, Emma, was diagnosed with strep throat. My once active daughter was now tiring easily and taking naps–something she never did before getting sick. Her pediatrician prescribed a 10-day treatment of antibiotics and the usual suggestions (e.g., get plenty of rest, drink lots of liquids, etc.) that normally accompany an illness like this.

Toward the end of the 10 days, my daughter wasn’t showing any signs of improvement; she still had a high fever and was very lethargic. That Saturday night, my wife and I decided that we should take her to the emergency room. We knew something wasn’t right. Continue reading