Book Review: “Let Your Hearts and Minds Expand” by Thomas F. Rogers

imagesReview of Let Your Hearts and Minds Expand by Thomas F. Rogers.

Part of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship’s “Living Faith” series.

In his Foreword to this Book, Terryl L. Givens states he wants to “get out of the way and let you the reader get on with” reading the book rather than waste time with an introduction.  I feel much the same way:  Just read this book, and forget about this book review.

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Recommended Reading for CES Instructors, in light of Elder Ballard’s recent remarks

If you follow any Mormon topics on any form of social media, it’s likely you’ve heard about Elder Ballard’s recent remarks:

“Gone are the days when a student asked an honest question and the teacher responded, ‘Don’t worry about it.’ Gone are the days when a student raised a sincere concern and a teacher bore his or her testimony as a response intended to avoid the issue.”

What I hope to do in this post is list a few resources that a seminary/institute (or even a really dedicated Sunday School teacher) could read to help them get the knowledge to either give good answers to these questions or to know where to look and find the answers. Continue reading

Holding onto Hope: The Rest of the Story

Note: Emma’s story was recently featured in the March edition of The Friend, a children’s magazine published by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The title of the article is “Holding onto Hope.” This blog post tells the rest of Emma’s story.

Emma on the couchIn early spring of 2014, my seven-year old daughter, Emma, was diagnosed with strep throat. My once active daughter was now tiring easily and taking naps–something she never did before getting sick. Her pediatrician prescribed a 10-day treatment of antibiotics and the usual suggestions (e.g., get plenty of rest, drink lots of liquids, etc.) that normally accompany an illness like this.

Toward the end of the 10 days, my daughter wasn’t showing any signs of improvement; she still had a high fever and was very lethargic. That Saturday night, my wife and I decided that we should take her to the emergency room. We knew something wasn’t right. Continue reading

The Berlin Wall and Me.

Berlin 4It was June 3rd 1991, and I had graduated from high school exactly three days before. I sat with suit cases assembled at a gate in the Phoenix airport, surrounded by family, my friends, and my German teacher. A group of students from my school were headed off to Germany for a month to be exchange students in Berlin. It was going to be my first big adventure as a newly minted “adult”.

Fifteen hours and a very uncomfortable plane ride later, we landed in Munich. After we had toured Bavaria and Austria for a week, we boarded the equivalent of a Greyhound bus, and were Berlin bound. As we drove northward out of Bavaria into Thuringia, the roads became bumpier and less maintained; a sign of communist neglect. We passed fields of bright yellow flowers and forests of thick green trees. What a contrast to the monolithic apartment blocks and dismal architecture of East Germany. As we approached Berlin, evidence of East Germany’s desire to keep people from fleeing to the west became very evident. Abandoned, yet intimidating, grey gates and check points were our gateway into Berlin. Shortly we would meet our host families and begin our stay in the Spandau Quarter of the city, and would attend Hans-Carossa Oberschule. Continue reading