Justified Civil Disobedience.

I rarely go political. I’m going to do so today, against my better judgment.

Illegal Immigration is justified Civil Disobedience on a massive scale.

A few points:

1.  I refuse to use PC terms like “undocumented worker” or simply “migrant” (or “immigrant”);  that robs it if the true power of what is happening.  Yes – it’s illegal – and that’s the whole point.  Civil Disobedience isn’t really civil disobedience if it  isn’t breaking a law.

2.  Opposition and a desire to enforce the borders is not, in my mind, usually racist.  It’s a disagreement.  Some people value keeping the law, and while I disagree in this one instance, I despise the constant accusations of racism that occur when this debate happens.  Yes, there is racism, and I’ve seen it (I have relatives who hate Mexicans merely because of their darker skin and different language), but the accusation of racism is too casually thrown about.

3.  Read this article (warning – some bad language) which only scratches the surface of what is wrong with current immigration law.  I am not necessarily a totally 100% open border advocate, but our current immigration laws and policies are evil and deserve to be ignored.

I think that’s good for now.  We’ll see what the rest of all y’all have to say.

The Angels of Darkness – More on Sherlock Holmes and Mormons (well, Mormons, anyway)

I feel that sufficient time has passed since Geoff pointed out the interesting Mormon bits in the first Sherlock Holmes tale, A Study in Scarlet (interestingly, the first time I ever read that story, it was in an abridged version that cut out the Mormon bits.  I didn’t find out about the Mormon chapters until college).  Anyway, There is one other Sherlock Holmes tale featuring Mormons.

Except that there’s no Sherlock Holmes (but Watson is there). And it’s the same tale (sort of).  Read on to find out more: Continue reading

I will not leave you comfortless

One of my favorite stories is when President Monson felt impressed one General Conference to deviate from his prepared remarks and speak directly to a little girl seated in the north balcony of the Tabernacle.

During a particularly difficult and painful personal trial, I sought my Heavenly Father in prayer, asking Him for a special message during an upcoming Stake Conference session. I spent a great deal of time on my knees, pleading for a personal message and comfort from the heavy burdens of this trial.

As I drove to the Stake Center, I had a prayer in my heart, asking once again to receive the blessing this little girl had received.

I had volunteered to serve as an usher during the morning session of the conference, so I was seated close to the doors in the back of the chapel. It must have been one of the first speakers–a member of the Stake Presidency, I think–who started his talk with the message I had prayed for.

I do not recall the exact words he spoke, but I remember him saying that he felt impressed that several had come seeking answers to prayers. He said that he felt impressed to let us know that our Heavenly Father was aware of our struggles and that he would bless us with peace and comfort.

As the counselor spoke these words, I had to leave the chapel as I was overcome with emotion. I entered one of the open offices, fell to my knees, and wept. I felt a tremendous sense of gratitude that my prayer had been answered. As I was on my knees, I offered a prayer of thanks to my Heavenly Father for the reassurance that He loved me and that I was not left without comfort.

In a few short days, I will leave my family to start a new job in Connecticut. My wife has felt a great deal of anxiety about the impending move and has prayed  seeking for comfort and answers to her prayers. During both of Saturday’s sessions, she heard talks that were direct answers to her prayers.

I am thankful for a loving Heavenly Father who hears and answers prayers. He will not leave us comfortless (John 14:8).

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