About Ivan Wolfe

Ivan Wolfe teaches rhetoric at Arizona State University. He has a PhD in English from the University of Texas - Austin, and a BA and MA in English (with minors in Classical Greek, Music, and Philosophy) from BYU. He has several credits on various Christmas albums aimed at the LDS market, several essays in Open Court's Popular Culture and Philosophy series, and various book reviews in academic and popular venues. He also competes in Scottish Highland Games and mud run/obstacle course races, and he can deadlit over double his bodyweight (his last PR was over 500 pounds). He is currently married to Lisa Renee Wolfe. He has six kids and four stepkids.

Book Review: “Let Your Hearts and Minds Expand” by Thomas F. Rogers

imagesReview of Let Your Hearts and Minds Expand by Thomas F. Rogers.

Part of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship’s “Living Faith” series.

In his Foreword to this Book, Terryl L. Givens states he wants to “get out of the way and let you the reader get on with” reading the book rather than waste time with an introduction.  I feel much the same way:  Just read this book, and forget about this book review.

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Regardless of your feelings on the election

Just keep in mind what it is all really about:

For I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.”

Romans 8:38-39

 

The Case for Boromir

“The Ring must go to Boromir.  Taking it to Mount Doom is too risky, and the chance of success is nil.  You can’t win that way.”

“But Gandalf said it was the only way to ensure . . .”

“Gandalf is dead; he is of no use to us now.  Sauron will overrun the world of men and destroy us all unless we retaliate in kind, with the kind of power he respects – the kind of power that can defeat him.”

“But the ring is evil and may well corrupt Boromir.” Continue reading

Book Review, Apocalypse: Reading Revelation 21-22. Julie M. Smith, editor.

Review, Apocalypse: Reading Revelation 21-22. Julie M. Smith, editor. 

From the Proceedings of the Mormon Theology Seminar.

Published by The Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship.

418gtmufail-_sy346_Full disclosure up front: generally, I don’t consider myself a fan of doing “Mormon theology.”  Not that I find the concept inherently incorrect, but that the results (usually) disappoint me.  However, this slim volume, from “The Proceeding of the Mormon Theology Seminar” is a happy exception; even if I didn’t find value in all the essays, I found the collection, overall, quite valuable. Continue reading